The Great Joe Pass

This site celebrates Joe Pass. AllMusic does its usual nice job of profiling the great and iconic The jazz guitarist:

Joe Pass did the near-impossible. He was able to play up-tempo versions of bop tunes such as “Cherokee” and “How High the Moon” unaccompanied on the guitar. Unlike Stanley Jordan, Pass used conventional (but superb) technique, and his Virtuoso series on Pablo still sounds remarkable decades later.

Joe Pass had a false start in his career. He played in a few swing bands (including Tony Pastor’s) before graduating from high school, and was with Charlie Barnet for a time in 1947. But after serving in the military, Pass became a drug addict, serving time in prison and essentially wasting a decade. He emerged in 1962 with a record cut at Synanon, made a bit of a stir with his For Django set, recorded several other albums for Pacific Jazz and World Pacific, and performed with Gerald Wilson, Les McCann, George Shearing, and Benny Goodman (1973). (Continue Reading…)

Above is Joe’s Blues and below is the Billy Strayhorn/Duke Ellington composition Satin Doll. Pass describes his approach to improvisation at the end of Joe’s Blues.

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