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JJ Cale Took it Easy

Two of the biggest stars in modern music — Neil Young and Eric Clapton — are fans of JJ Cale, who died in July 2013. Cale’s site offers a quote from Young’s autobiography:

Most of the songs and the riffs – the way he plays the fucking guitar is so.. great. And he doesn’t play very loud, either – I really like that about him. He’s so sensitive. Of all the players I ever heard, it’s gotta be Hendrix and JJ Cale who are the best electric guitar players.

Clapton’s feeling for Cale is proven simply by the fact that the two made an album together. It stands to reason that Clapton can pick and choose his collaborators at this point. The Rosebud Agency, which represents Cale, has a very interesting video featuring Cale and Clapton discussing the project. Rosebud, by the way, has a great roster of clients.

Here is Cale’s fan club page and the beginning of Cale’s Wikipedia profile:

JJ Cale (also J.J. Cale), born John Weldon Cale[1] on December 5, 1938, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,[1] is a Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter and musician. Cale is one of the originators of the Tulsa Sound, a loose genre drawing on bluesrockabillycountry, and jazz influences. Cale’s personal style has often been described as “laid back”. Continue Reading..

Above is Devil in Disguise. Cale is accompanied by Christine Lakeland. Below is After Midnight and Call Me the Breeze, featuring Cale and Clapton. The second song, which starts at about the 5 minute mark, is particularly noteworthy. The performance was at the 2004 Crossroads Guitar Festival in Dallas. Here is the post from a few days after Cale died.

(Homepage photo: Louis Ramirez)

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