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Seu Jorge Renews Samba

I cross post The Daily Music Break at Daily Kos. A commenter there pointed out Seu Jorge, who he or she had seen in the Wes Anderson/Bill Murray film The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

Here is the beginning of Seu Jorge’s profile at Wikipedia:

Seu Jorge (born June 8, 1970; Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsew ˈʒɔʁʒi]) is a Brazilian musician, singer/songwriter and actor. Born Jorge Mário da Silva, he was raised in a favela in what is now known as the city of Belford Roxo. Belford Roxo is located north of city of Rio de Janeiro in Rio de Janeiro state in the Baixada Fluminense region. When he was 19, he became homeless and remained homeless for 3 years, nonetheless, his musical talent flourished when he was living in the streets and he became known in the “favelas”. Due to its proximity, Belford Roxo is considered part of the larger metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. He is considered by many a renewer of Brazilian pop samba. Seu Jorge cites samba schools, and American soul singer Stevie Wonder as major musical influences.[2] (Continue  Reading…)

Above in Portuguese is the David Bowie song Changes,  which he performed in City of God, which was his first movie. Below is a duet with Ana Carolina. The name of the song is É isso Aí. 

Seu Jorge’s can be heard in in interview embedded in NPR’s World Cafe, which also offers nice feature story.

Here is Ana Carolina, Seu Jorge – É Isso Aí (The Blower’s Daughter) featuring Jorge and Ana Carolina.

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Here are some books to check out.

Duke Ellington brought class, sophistication and style to jazz which, until that point, was proudly unpolished and raucous. His story is profound. The author, Terry Teachout, also wrote "Pops," the acclaimed bio of Louis Armstrong. Click here or on the image.

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What else is there to say? Here is the story behind every song written by The Beatles. Click here or on the image.

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The Grateful Dead don't get enough credit for the profound nature of its lyrics. Many of the band's songs are driven by a deep and literate Americana ("I'm Uncle Sam/That's who I am/Been hidin' out/In a rock and roll band" and "Majordomo Billy Bojangles/Sit down and have a drink with me/What's this about Alabama/Keeps comin' back to me?").

David Dodd's exhaustive study tells the story, song by song. Click here or on the image.

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